02.11.2016.

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Censored Imre Bak


2015 | enamel, frame, museum glass | 85x75 cm
original artwork: Imre Bak: Serigraph II. | 1969, serigraph paint, paper | 70x60 cm

The archetype and one of the sources of inspiration for Lőrinc Borsos’s project was Robert Rauschenberg’s work entitled Erased de Kooning Drawing from 1953. Rauschenberg, who is regarded as a key figure of American Pop Art, contacted his friend Willem de Kooning, a master of American Abstract Expressionism, to ask if he could erase one of his drawings. With this provocative gesture, Rauschenberg announced the triumph of the new generation while simultaneously acknowledging the relevance of continuity, in other words that we inevitably construct ourselves by treading in the footsteps of our predecessors.

Lőrinc Borsos revived this story in an interpretation of Imre Bak, one of the most significant representatives of Hungarian abstract painting and an artist whom Lőrinc Borsos regards as an exemplary master. His attention was drawn to Bak by this and by instances of censorship in the past that constitute the subject matter of the exhibition. An abstract painting by Imre Bak was removed from the 1967 annual exhibition of the Studio of Young Artists, in other words it was censored due to cultural political considerations. In the present exhibition, Lőrinc Borsos alludes to this event by covering a work by Bak from this period with a "dark matter", naturally working in close collaboration with the artist and thereby raising the question of authorship.

This "dark matter" is the main identification element of Lőrinc Borsos’s art, and it has been part of his paintings from the outset. The ordinary industrial enamel paint, which according to Borsos opens up mystical dimensions despite its profane quality, digs a symbolic wormhole, a gateway between times and subjects, between seemingly irreconcilable oppositions, between the "self" and the "other". The artist’s goal is to create, together with contemporary artists, works of art infected with the dark matter.


Censored Imre Bak

photo by Máté Balázs

 
Censored Imre Bak

photo by Máté Balázs